Post Traumatic Stress Order and Brain Injuries

Victims hurt in a Florida car crash, slip and fall or as the result of careless doctors usually seek immediate medical attention for their physical pain and suffering. Rarely is any focus put on the more difficult to diagnose trauma known as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, P.T.S.D. As a Miami PI attorney, I am alarmed if I hear a client complain about sleep loss, terrible images being replayed in their head, or feelings of guilt or fear. Granted, the majority of our clients who suffer these normal post-trauma reactions to one degree or another recover and return to a relatively normal state within weeks or months of an accident. However, some do not. A small percentage of people get trapped in their trauma and experience chronic P.T.S.D. The way one copes with emotional trauma is far more complex than once thought. One of the challenges in diagnosing P.T.S.D. lies in the fact that the symptoms often do not surface for weeks or months after the event. Signs of P.T.S.D. can, according to the Mayo Clinic, take years to develop. Generally, P.T.S.D. is grouped into three classes: Intrusive Memories, Avoidance or Emotional Arousal. Symptoms of intrusive memories typically include flashbacks and nightmares of the event. Symptoms of Avoidance include feelings of numbness, hopelessness and memory problems. Symptoms of Increased Emotional Arousal may include. irritability, guilt, shame, trouble sleeping or self-destructive behavior. Often, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms can come and go. The symptoms can intensify when the person is under more stress in general. In addition, symptoms can be brought up by seeing a movie, the smell of a familiar scent...

Florida Women Dies from Plastic Surgery

As a Broward plastic surgery malpractice lawyer, I was deeply saddened by the recent news of that Idell Frazer, a 50-year old Florida grandmother, lost her life during a liposuction and fat transfer at Strax Rejuvenation and Aesthetics Institute. Our law office is currently representing the family of Lidvian Zelaya who died during the same procedure last year. You can read the filed Stamped Complaint-8731.pdf Fat embolisms are one of the many known complications associated with fat re-injection procedures. Pulmonary embolisms occur when a blood clot forms and clogs an artery in a patient’s lung. Any plastic surgery patient can develop a pulmonary embolism or “PE” but certain factors increase the risk: 1. Surgery is the leading cause of blood clots. The risk of developing a blood clot increases with the duration of anesthesia. In other words the longer the procedure the higher the risk of developing a blood clot. This is one of the reasons that multiple cosmetic procedures are not recommended to be performed during one operation. 2. Prolonged immobility. Blood clots are more likely to form in the legs after patients are subjected to prolonged bed rest (recuperating from surgery) or from sitting in cramped positions during long car trips or flights. 3. Age. Older patients are at a higher risk for an embolism because the valves that move blood in the veins become increasingly inefficient with age. Older patients are more commonly dehydrated and have co-morbid medical conditions like cancer or heat disease which can increase the risk for a clot. 4. Family History. It is important that doctors, particularly those performing elective cosmetic procedures...

Januvia and Janumet Claims for Pancreatitis

The FDA has issued a formal warning letter to Merck for being months late on two post-market study deadlines to assess acute pancreatic damage risk associated with the diabetes drugs Janumet and Januvia. Januvia (sitagliptin) is a medication approved for the treatment of adults with Type-2 diabetes. It is one of the first in a new class of medications known as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, Janumet combines Januvia with metaformin. The FDA required Merck perform additional testing following increasing concerns over a Januvia pancreatitis over risk three years ago. Merck broke its promise to conduct the three-month pancreatic safety study after the FDA expanded approvals for Januvia and Janumet. The study was due to be completed by March 15, 2011, and a final report should have been presented to the FDA by June 15, 2011. It was not. One Januvia pancreatic cancer study in 2011 did find indications that the drug may increase the risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The FDA warning appears to be the first time the FDA has invoked its new enforcement authority for postmarking requirements granted under the 2007 FDA Amendments Act. Violations of this obligation can result in charges of mislabeling, and in fines of $250,000 and potentially more if they continue. As a dangerous medication attorney, I am pleased that this may signal a new trend at the agency for holding manufacturers more accountable. Our Januvia and Janumet claims lawyers advise that if you are taking one of these medications to discuss the risks and benefits with your prescribing doctor. We encourage you to report any adverse events you may have on...

One Of Florida’s Best Laws For The Injured

Those injured in a Miami traffic accident or slip and fall in a Florida store often receive medical or chiropractic treatment from a clinic or doctor that “specializes” in accident cases. Usually, that means they work with personal injury lawyers, are willing to wait to receive payment, and are comfortable testifying in court. Occasionally, if the injury is serious enough, an invasive procedure might be performed after other treatment modalities fail. Our clients have undergone many different kinds of surgical procedures ranging from epidural blocks to multilevel disk fusions. When this happens, one of the classic defense tactics at trial is to argue that the treatment or surgery was unnecessary. The objective is to persuade the jury to shift the blame for the plaintiff’s injuries to the treating physician and away from the defendant. Some South Florida hit and run car crash injury lawyers, and many of those hurt in Florida accidents, may not be aware that the cost and impairment of any alleged unnecessary surgery or treatment is actually the responsibility of the defendant, who caused the accident in the first place. Recently, Florida’s Second District Court of Appeal, in the case of Pedro v. Barber, cited one the most important cases in Florida’s personal injury tort law: Stuart v. Hertz Corporation. Ms. Baber was involved in a rear-end car accident. After conservative treatment failed, she sought a consultation with an orthopedic surgeon Dr. Nucci. Dr. Nucci performed surgery to repair a herniated lumbar disco and annular tear. The Pedro’s insurance defense lawyers hired doctors to testify that Ms. Baber had degenerative lower back issues that were not...

How to Avoid Being a Victim of an Operating Room Fire

As a Florida anesthesia malpractice injury attorney, I was concerned by a recent FDA study that revealed that nearly 650 fires occur in United States operating rooms, during routine surgeries, every year. Often times, these fires can cause serious injury and disfigurement, and when the fire occurs in the patients airway, it can be fatal. In addition, there can be a profound psychological impact on the medical staff that is involved in a surgical fire. Most agree that the root cause of surgical fires involves the use of supplemental high concentrations of oxygen, via an open delivery system, which creates an oxidized enriched atmosphere next to an ignition source, such as an electrosurgical unit or laser. This is referred to as the “Fire Triangle.” Since the FDA regulates many of the medical devices used in surgery, such as medical gases, skin preparation agents, electrosurgical units, and surgical drapes, they have undertaken initiatives to reduce the numbers of surgical fires. The FDA and the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation agree that anesthesia professionals can contribute to patient safety and minimize the risk of surgical fires. A Fire Prevention Algorithm has been suggested to be used, before surgeries, to assess the particular risk for specific patients undergoing specific surgeries. As a lawyer, who sues doctors for operating room mistakes, I believe that the prevention of surgical fires in operating rooms is not just the responsibility of the anesthesiologist, but rather the responsibility of the surgical team. The surgical team consists of the surgeons, operating room nurses, and anesthesia professionals, who should work together to identify a patient’s risk and then minimize it....
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