Selecting Expert Witness in Personal Injury Cases

EXPERT WITNESSES Effective use of an expert witness in personal injury cases can make the difference between winning and losing. In some cases, like medical malpractice, expert witnesses’ opinions are required even before a lawsuit can be filed. I have found the selecting of appropriate experts to be vitally important. Many lawyers, depending on the area of law they practice, maintain a book or bank of experts they call upon with regularity.  For instance, an auto insurance defense firm or a cruise line may use the same three or four experts in different cases several times a week.  It is not unusual, for instance, to see a neurologist or an orthopedic surgeon hired by a defense firm or cruise line spending more time and making more money testifying than actually seeing and treating patients. While this may also be true of the plaintiff’s practice, I can only base my experience on what I have seen and heard. I personally try to utilize different doctors or experts as often as I can, so as to deflate the defense’s potential arguments of bias or prejudice. The benefit of using tried and true experts versus the risk of the unknown is difficult for any lawyer to weigh. Therefore, thoughtful selection of experts is important in maximizing your client’s potential for success both in and out of the courtroom. Perhaps the most valuable trait I look for when selecting an expert is his or her ability to articulate opinions in a manner that is believable, likable, modest, and honest. In nearly 25 years of litigating cases across the United States, I think I...

Injured on Cruise Ship, Passenger Killed by Doctors Onboard

For decades, passengers who have been injured on cruise ships–like Carnival, Royal Caribbean, Celebrity or Norwegian–and received negligent medical care from the ship’s doctors have had a difficult if not impossible time holding the cruise lines accountable for the doctors’ errors.  Thankfully, this week a United States Appellate Court has issued an opinion that will make it far easier for passengers injured on cruise ships to sue cruise lines for medical malpractice. The case involved an elderly cruise ship passenger who fell and bashed his head while on a cruise on RCCL’s Explorer of the Seas, which was docked at port in Bermuda. The passenger, Pasquale Vaglio, was wheeled back onto the ship, where he sought treatment in the ship’s medical center. The treatment was so negligent that he fell into a coma and died a week later. According to the court’s records, the ship’s health care providers failed to diagnose his cranial trauma by not conducting any diagnostic scans.  The ship’s doctor did not even examine Mr. Vaglio for nearly four hours. Mr. Vaglio’s daughter, Patricia Franza, sued Royal Caribbean Cruises, Ltd. (“Royal Caribbean”) for vicarious liability for the purported negligence of two of its employees, the ship’s doctor and its nurse, under one of two theories: actual agency (also termed respondeat superior) or apparent agency. She filed her lawsuit against Royal Caribbean in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida in Miami, under 28 U.S.C. § 1333 and the general maritime law, but District Court judge Hon. Judge Joan A. Lenard dismissed her complaint on June 14, 2013 by applying the longstanding Barbetta...

Supreme Court Declares Florida’s Medical Malpractice Caps Unconstitutional

I am a Florida medical malpractice lawyer who helps patients and their families when one of them has been injured or killed by careless doctors and hospitals. For most of my legal career, I have been unable to get victims full justice for their pain and suffering. Since 2003, Florida’s healthcare industry has slept soundly, knowing that regardless of what verdict a jury may return against them, they would be insulated by Florida Statute §766.118 and thereby would not be held fully accountable to pay any amount in excess of $500,000 for an injury, or $1,000,000 for the death of a patient, regardless of how many children or dependents were left behind. Thankfully, all that has now changed. The Florida Supreme, after over a decade of challenges, has finally declared those caps unconstitutional. Their decision was based upon the case of Michelle McCall, who died after she bled to death following a caesarean section during the birth of her a son in February 2006 at a U.S. Air Force hospital in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. A United States federal judge agreed that McCall had not received proper care and found that her parents and son should receive $2 million for their pain and suffering. But then that verdict award was reduced to $1 million to comply with Florida’s damages cap. The verdict was challenged on appeal to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta as violating the U.S. Constitution. The appellate court upheld the verdict, ruling that it did not violate the federal law, but suggested that the Florida Supreme Court should consider if it violated the...

Protecting People from Dangerous Drugs

When it comes to potentially dangerous drugs–like testosterone replacement therapies—or cars, or even a light bulb, manufacturers always know more about the product’s risks than its consumer does. The law in our country that protects us from makers of those products–who put their profit ahead of the safety of people–is commonly referred to as strict liability. STRICT LIABILITY LAW The law of strict liability dates back hundreds of years, when people were found to be legally responsible for the damages they caused by conducting certain “inherently dangerous activities,” like transporting dynamite or keeping a tiger in their apartment. In those situations, to win their cases the plaintiffs or injured parties do not have to prove that the defendant was careless, but merely the extent of their injuries. That is a significantly easier case for a plaintiff. As the law has evolved, it has become one of the few remaining protections of the injured when a dangerous or defective product is sold that hurts or kills people. GM RECALLS 1.6 MILLION CARS The most compelling and recent example of how the strict liability law can be used to protect the injured is the delayed recall by General Motors of nearly 2 million vehicles that have faulty ignition systems and have been linked to a dozen deaths. The defect that prompted the recall is a faulty ignition switch that can suddenly turn off a car, leaving it difficult to steer and disabling its air bags. The cause has been traced to not having enough resistance in the ignition switch to counter the weight of heavy keys and key chains. This is also an important...

Surgery Malpractice Lawyers Investigate Robotic Surgery Cases

Leer este artículo en Español. The future is now for patients undergoing surgeries performed by robots. Robotic surgery has been around since 1998–when a German patient at the Leipzig Heart Center underwent minimally invasive surgery performed by a robot. http://youtu.be/kdXb2mfK5wU In robotic surgery, the robot’s movements are controlled remotely by a human surgeon who sits at a console that features a magnified 3D high-definition view of the surgical site. According to the promoters of da Vinci, a robotic surgical system made by the American company Intuitive Surgical, the benefits for patients with robotic surgery include feeling less pain, experiencing shorter recovery time, and–depending on the operation–less blood loss, because apparently a robotic arm is more precise, has greater range of motion and, unlike a human hand, does not tremble. So far, Intuitive Surgical has sold more than 2,500 surgery robots to hospitals all over the world and enjoyed revenues in excess of $2 billion last year alone. Since going public just 13 years ago at $9 a share, Intuitive’s stock price has soared above $500 a share, making its current market value over $20 billion. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY (MIS) Minimally Invasive Surgeries performed by da Vinci robots are those where a small incision is used, rather than a larger zipper-like opening. So far, more than 1.5 million MIS operations using the da Vinci robot have been performed, ranging from abdominal general surgery and gynecology procedures to thoracic and lung operations. ROBOTIC SURGERY DANGERS In May, Intuitive issued an “urgent medical device notification” to doctors, hospitals, and the FDA that it had “identified a potential issue” with one of the...

Recalled Vaginal Mesh Cases

The country’s first trial against a manufacturer of a vaginal mesh ended during the second day of testimony when Federal Judge Joseph Goodwin declared a mistrial. The trial being heard in Charleston, West Virginia came to a grinding halt when the plaintiff’s expert, Lennox Hoyte, M.D., testified about that the defendant, CR Bard, Inc., had withdrawn the device from the market last year, in direct contradiction to the court’s ruling to exclude that fact from the jury. The case was one of four bellwether cases set for trial at that time. The four case are . . . Cisson, et al. v. C. R. Bard, Inc. 2:11-cv-00195 Queen, et al. v. C. R. Bard, Inc. 2:11-cv-00012 Rizzo, et al. v. C. R. Bard, Inc. 2:10-cv-01224 Jones v. C. R. Bard, Inc. 2:11-cv-00114 ARVE Error: no video ID set EFFECTS OF A MISTRIAL I have, sadly, experienced several times the heartbreak of a having a judge declare a mistrial. It can be very difficult and expensive for the plaintiff’s lawyers, who have blocked off enormous time and spent much money to prepare for trial. A trial of this magnitude, I imagine, took months if not years for the lawyers to prepare. At that point in the trial, a jury had already been selected, and opening arguments had been made. The defense had already heard the specific questions and how they case was themed by the plaintiffs and could go back and re-tune the defense for the next trial. It is as if after the first ten minutes of the Super Bowl, the referees had declared a “do over.” Another problem...
Facebook IconYouTube IconTwitter IconLinkedinLinkedin